Category Archives: News

Home Movie Day 2014

Saturday, October 18, 11am to 3pm • Free Admission
Chicago History Museum • 1601 N. Clark St. (Guild Room)

Better-Living_2014Co-presented with Chicago Film Archives

Home movies provide invaluable records of our families and our communities: they document vanished storefronts, questionable fashions, adorable pets, long-departed loved ones, and neighborhoods-in-transition. Many Chicagoans still possess these old reels, passed down from generation to generation, but lack the projection equipment to view them properly and safely. That’s where Home Movie Day comes in: you bring the films, and we inspect them, project them, and offer tips on storage, preservation, and video transfer–all free of charge. And best of all, you get to watch them with an enthusiastic audience, equally hungry for local history. We’re also very fortunate to have silent film pianist extraordinaire, David Drazin, on-site to tastefully accompany your moving histories.

Chicago Home Movie Day is dedicated to YOUR home movies. From 11:00AM until 1:30PM archivists and projectionists will inspect and project all celluloid home movies that walk in the door. We encourage all providers of these gems to introduce their films to an eager HMD audience. From 1:30PM to 3:00PM, there will be a curated screening of home movies from the CFA and NWCFS collections that spotlight Chicago’s Hyde Park neighborhood and local railroads & trains. Highlights include a pet city goat named P.D. (short for Prosperity/ Depression), toddlers tumbling down the boulevard and a “League of American Wheelmen” cycle train excursion to Beloit, Wisconsin. Do you have any celluloid home movies that fit our themes? Even if they don’t, we’d love to include them! Give CFA a call at 312-243-1808 or just show up with those 8mm, Super8mm or 16mm reels.

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Chicago’s Own Shakespeare: Original Indie David Bradley’s Julius Caesar in 35mm at Block Cinema

Thursday, October 2  @ 7pm, Block Cinema, 40 Arts Circle Drive, Evanston
Evanston Casear JULIUS CAESAR

Directed by David Bradley • 1950
Not to be confused with M-G-M ‘s 1953 megaproduction, famed film collector and Chicago native David Bradley’s Julius Caesar was the first feature adaptation of Shakespeare’s play and Bradley’s second collaboration with then relatively unknown Charlton Heston (Mark Antony). Shot on 16mm with post-synchronized sound recorded primarily in an Evanston swimming pool, Caesar is a rich marriage of low-budget student theater productions (much of the cast was recruited from Northwestern’s theater department) and independent small gauge filmmaking, elevated by beautiful location photography at Chicago’s Museum Campus and the Indiana Sand Dunes. (JA)
106 min • Avon Productions • 35mm from Private Collections

Co-presented with Block Cinema and the Northwest Chicago Film Society

Tickets: $6 for the general public, $4 for Block members; University faculty, staff and students with valid WildCARD; students from other schools with valid college/university ID; seniors 60 and older

DIRECTIONS TO BLOCK HERE!

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Keep Watching the Skies — And Read Our Interview with Richard Linklater

BOYHOOD - 2014 FILM STILL - Ellar Coltrane
We’re working on securing a new venue and programming more films. News unreeling soon.

Until then, you should catch up with our interview with filmmaker (and film society programmer) Richard Linklater in the Chicago Reader: [Part 1] [Part 2]

Also: why not check out other Chicagoland 16mm and 35mm screenings at Celluloid Chicago or catch up on our blog? Or lounge around in our Program Archives to revel in the stuff you missed?

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Coming Attractions – Coming Soon!

MPAA in 70mm
We’re working on securing a new venue and programming more films. News unreeling soon.

Until then, why not check out other Chicagoland 16mm and 35mm screenings at Celluloid Chicago or catch up on our blog? Or lounge around in our Program Archives to revel in the stuff you missed?

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Meet 28mm — Your Favorite Film Gauge That You Never Knew Existed — Super-Rare Show on Wednesday at 8

Join us for an absurdly rare smattering of 28mm films – Including some original prints which are over 100 years old – in tribute to and in the spirit of the 13th INTERNATIONAL DOMITOR CONFERENCE.

Wednesday, June 25 @ 8 PM – Free Admission, Donations Accepted
Annie May Swift Hall, 1920 Campus Drive, Northwestern University

LIVE ACCOMPANIMENT by the Tatsu Aoki Silent Quartet, featuring Tatsu Aoki, Kioto Aoki, Edward Wilkerson, and Jamie Kemper

28mm Pathescope_700

New Adventures in 28mm: THAT MODEL FROM PARIS & Other Oddities
Developed at a time when 35mm motion picture film was synonymous with nitrate fires and the annihilating spirit of modernity, the 28mm gauge was a non-flammable alternative marketed to schools, churches, and the private domain. Used for both home movies and non-theatrical exhibition of commercial shorts and features, the 28mm format was the forerunner of the instructional film, the classroom filmstrip, Castle Films 8mm clips, and your VHS library. Widely used in America until World War I and in Europe until the emergence of the talkies, 28mm presentations are exceptionally rare today, even though many films survive only in this unjustly neglected format. Dino Everett, Archivist at USC Hugh M. Hefner Moving Image Archive and a longtime 28mm collector and advocate, will screen a representative sample of 28mm films on original projection equipment and provide an illuminating (but non-flammable) lecture on the history of the format.

Program includes:
That Model from Paris (Louis J. Gasnier, 1926) [Excerpts], The Life of George Washington (1909), The Crazy Villa (1913), The Gypsy’s Revenge (1908), and much more!

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Restored 35mm Print of Corn’s-A-Poppin’
Premieres at the Music Box on June 23

Monday, June 23 – Three Shows: 5 PM, 7 PM, and 9 PM
Music Box Theatre, 3733 N. Southport Ave. • Admission: $7

C-A-P Premiere
CORN’S-A-POPPIN’

Directed by Robert Woodburn • 1955
A regional independent film? A western swing musical?  An early Robert Altman script? A roman à clef about real-life popcorn baron Charles Manley? A masterpiece? Corn’s-A-Poppin’ is all these things and more. Produced on the cheap in a Kansas City by a band of young talent schooled in the production techniques of The Calvin Company, the Midwest’s most innovative industrial film studio, Corn’s-A-Poppin’ is just about the most free-wheeling and sing-able hour of cinema we’ve ever seen. Down-home crooner Jerry Wallace plays Johnny Wilson, the star of the Pinwhistle Popcorn Hour, a half-pint (and half-hour) variety show with acts ranging from pro-hog caller Lillian Gravelguard to Hobie Shepp and the Cowtown Wranglers. Might the cornpone bookings be an act of sabotage by rogue PR man Waldo Crummit in a bid to gut the Pinwhistle Empire? It’s up to Little Cora Rice to save the day. Songs include: “On Our Way to Mars,” “Running After Love,” and “Mama, Wanna Balloon.” Financed largely by regional showmen and out of circulation for decades, Chicago’s new cult classic has now been restored to its original earnest glory. (KW)
58 min • Crest Pictures, Inc. • 35mm

Restored by Northwest Chicago Film Society. Preservation funding provided by the National Film Preservation Foundation. Additional material courtesy of the Wisconsin Center for Film & Theater Research. Laboratory services by FotoKem.

Also on the program: Selected Country Soundies and Concessions Snipes

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And right on the heels of Corn’s-A-Poppin’ – a totally unique program on a forgotten film gauge! Join us for an absurdly rare smattering of 28mm films – Including some original prints which are over 100 years old – in tribute to and in the spirit of the 13th INTERNATIONAL DOMITOR CONFERENCE.

Wednesday, June 25 @ 8 PM – Free Admission, Donations Accepted
Annie May Swift Hall, 1920 Campus Drive, Northwestern University

28mm Pathescope_700

New Adventures in 28mm: THAT MODEL FROM PARIS & Other Oddities
Developed at a time when 35mm motion picture film was synonymous with nitrate fires and the annihilating spirit of modernity, the 28mm gauge was a non-flammable alternative marketed to schools, churches, and the private domain. Used for both home movies and non-theatrical exhibition of commercial shorts and features, the 28mm format was the forerunner of the instructional film, the classroom filmstrip, Castle Films 8mm clips, and your VHS library. Widely used in America until World War I and in Europe until the emergence of the talkies, 28mm presentations are exceptionally rare today, even though many films survive only in this unjustly neglected format. Dino Everett, Archivist at USC Hugh M. Hefner Moving Image Archive and a longtime 28mm collector and advocate, will screen a representative sample of 28mm films on original projection equipment and provide an illuminating (but non-flammable) lecture on the history of the format.

Program includes:
That Model from Paris (Louis J. Gasnier, 1926) [Excerpts], The Life of George Washington (1909), The Crazy Villa (1913), The Gypsy’s Revenge (1908), and much more!

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Stay Tuned – More Screenings Coming Soon

MPAA in 70mm

Until then, why not check out other Chicagoland 16mm and 35mm screenings at Celluloid Chicago or catch up on our blog?

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Corn’s-A-Poppin’ Restoration Premieres
May 4 at UCLA Film and Television Archive

Sunday, May 4, 7:00pm – Billy Wilder Theater
10899 Wilshire Boulevard, Los Angeles, CA 90024

CAP_Still
Presented in conjunction with “Robert Altman: A Retrospective”

Restoration Premiere. Restored by Northwest Chicago Film Society, with funding from the National Film Preservation Foundation. Additional material courtesy of the Wisconsin Center for Film & Theater Research. Laboratory services by FotoKem.

Corn’s-A-Poppin’ (1955)
Directed by Robert Woodburn
Scripted by Altman after his disappointing sojourn as a Hollywood screenwriter, Corn’s-A-Poppin’ is a bargain-basement backstage musical that puts the corn in cornpone. Country-western crooner Jerry Wallace gleefully hosts the Pinwhistle Popcorn Hour—until he discovers that the TV program is a corrupt ad man’s scheme to liquidate the sponsor. Can Wallace and his kid sister Little Cora Rice save the day and save the popcorn? Produced in Kansas City by a cast and crew of Calvin Company veterans, Corn’s-A-Poppin’ saw extremely limited play in Midwestern drive-ins before disappearing for decades. Introduced by Kyle Westphal

Crest Productions Inc.  Producer: Elmer C. Rhoden, Jr.  Screenwriter: Robert Altman, Robert Woodburn.  Cinematographer: Robert Woodburn.  Editor: Carl Pierson (uncr.)  Cast: Jerry Wallace, Pat McReynolds, Little Cora Rice, James Lantz, Keith Painton, Hobie Shepp and the Cowtown Wranglers

35mm, b/w, 58 min

Chicago Premiere Coming Soon!

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Ann Dvorak Biographer Christina Rice Presents The Strange Love of Molly Louvain – Archival 35mm Print

As you’ve probably heard, the Patio Theater will be shutting down for the foreseeable future due to unsustainable operating costs. The Strange Love of Molly Louvain will be the final screening at the Patio.  If you’ve hesitated about joining us for a show at the Patio or you know folks who’ve waffled on making the trek, this is it!

Is the Northwest Chicago Film Society ending, too? Of course not–we’ll still be presenting occasional screenings and working on special projects like our Corn’s-A-Poppin’ restoration as we strive to secure a new, long-term home. We know that we have the most dedicated audience in Chicagoland–and that’s why we feel we can and must move forward. Please stay on our mailing list and keep a look-out for celluloid news.

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The Patio Theater – 6008 W Irving Park Road – $5.00 per ticket
For the full schedule of classic film screenings at the Patio, please click here.

Louvain_A

Wednesday, April 23 @ 7:30pm
THE STRANGE LOVE OF MOLLY LOUVAIN
Directed by Michael Curtiz • 1932
Iowa cigarette counter salesgirl Molly Louvain (Ann Dvorak) has everything figured out until her country club boyfriend leaves her penniless and pregnant. Hitting the road with a greasy lowlife (Leslie Fenton), Molly eventually winds up in Chicago, where she gets mixed up with a cop killing. Fawned over by a hayseed hometown suitor (Richard Cromwell) and pursued by transparently cynical newspaperman Scotty “Peanuts” Cornell (Lee Tracy), Molly finds herself in a clinch that even blonde hair dye can’t fix. A rare starring showcase for the wonderful Dvorak, The Strange Love of Molly Louvain is a brisk maternal melodrama and a mettle-testing gauntlet of spontaneous sincerity. Based on a play by Chicago’s Maurine Watkins, this nevertheless rates as one of the most geographically inept depictions of the Second City on film: a key scene occurs at the intersection of Clark and Dearborn, while Hyde Park comes across as Lake Michigan’s version of The Bronx.  (KW)
73 min • First National • 35mm from Library of Congress, permission Warner Bros.
Co-sponsored by Park Ridge Classic Film Series
Introduced by Christina Rice, author of Ann Dvorak: Hollywood’s Forgotten Rebel

Rice-Dvorak
Christina Rice will also introduce Scarface (1932) at the Pickwick Theatre on Thursday, April 24 at 7:30pm. Full details here.

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Tuning In, Taking Off, Dropping Out:
Forman’s American Odyssey in 35mm

The Patio Theater – 6008 W Irving Park Road – $5.00 per ticket
For the full schedule of classic film screenings at the Patio, please click here.

Taking Off_Henry
Wednesday, April 2 @ 7:30pm
TAKING OFF
Directed by Milos Forman • 1971
Roger Ebert said it best: “[Milos Forman has] a rich appreciation for the everyday lives of people who do not realize how funny they are.” Few people are as funny, sweet, or immensely human as the middle-aged couple Larry and Lynn Tyne (played by Buck Henry and Lynn Carlin), whose teenage daughter Jeannie (Linnea Heacock) has run away from home to be with the hippie weirdos of 1971 (led in part by Carly Simon). As the couple searches for their daughter, they meet other parents looking for their runaway children and inadvertently rediscover their youth with the help of the Society for Parents of Fugitive Children. At once a vibrant cultural artifact and a gentle social commentary, Forman has kinder things to say about dysfunctional people living in  dysfunctional times than any of his peers, and finds genuine joy even in the bleakest situations. With Paul Benedict, Vincent Schiavelli, and Ike and Tina Turner. (JA)
93 min • Universal Pictures • 35mm from Universal

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Louvain_A

Wednesday, April 23 @ 7:30pm
THE STRANGE LOVE OF MOLLY LOUVAIN
Directed by Michael Curtiz • 1932
Iowa cigarette counter salesgirl Molly Louvain (Ann Dvorak) has everything figured out until her country club boyfriend leaves her penniless and pregnant. Hitting the road with a greasy lowlife (Leslie Fenton), Molly eventually winds up in Chicago, where she gets mixed up with a cop killing. Fawned over by a hayseed hometown suitor (Richard Cromwell) and pursued by transparently cynical newspaperman Scotty “Peanuts” Cornell (Lee Tracy), Molly finds herself in a clinch that even blonde hair dye can’t fix. A rare starring showcase for the wonderful Dvorak, The Strange Love of Molly Louvain is a brisk maternal melodrama and a mettle-testing gauntlet of spontaneous sincerity. Based on a play by Chicago’s Maurine Watkins, this nevertheless rates as one of the most geographically inept depictions of the Second City on film: a key scene occurs at the intersection of Clark and Dearborn, while Hyde Park comes across as Lake Michigan’s version of The Bronx.  (KW)
73 min • First National • 35mm from Library of Congress, permission Warner Bros.
Co-sponsored by Park Ridge Classic Film Series
Introduced by Christina Rice, author of Ann Dvorak: Hollywood’s Forgotten Rebel

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