His Love — or His Life! Clint Eastwood in Don Siegel’s
The Beguiled — Rare 35mm Screening at the Portage

The Portage Theater – 4050 N. Milwaukee Ave – $5.00 per ticket
For the full schedule of classic film screenings at the Portage, please click here.

Wednesday, November 28th @ 7:30pm
THE BEGUILED
Directed Don Siegel • 1971
When wounded Yankee soldier John McBurney (Clint Eastwood) wanders out of the woods and into a girl’s seminary, he expects an ample helping of Southern hospitality. (His early question—“Too young for kissing?”—is emblematic.) Literally the cock of the walk, the super-virile Eastwood inspires a plantation-wide gynecological surge, pushing even long-dormant hens to resume laying eggs. Half the plantation plots to sleep with him, including the family-friendly headmistress (Geraldine Page) and her repressed assistant (Elizabeth Hartman). But even a stud’s progress can be undone by a child’s tortoise. One of the rare films to take men seriously as sex objects, The Beguiled brilliantly straddles arthouse psychodrama and drive-in exploitation fest. (Both demographics stayed away anyway.) Master craftsman Siegel never topped the baroque intensity on display here. Programmer Peter Conheim has summed up its essential qualities as well as anyone: “Part plantation melodrama, part gothic horror and part salacious romp, The Beguiled plays like a Technicolor nocturnal emission.” (KW)
105 min • Universal Pictures • 35mm from Universal
Short: The Three Stooges in “Uncivil Warriors” (Del Lord, 1935) – 35mm – 20 min

————–

Not morbid enough for you? How about ….

Sunday, December 2nd @ 7:00pm
THE ANIMATION OF WLADYSLAW STAREWICZ
Wladyslaw Starewicz • 1912-1934
The inexplicably creepy stop motion films of Russian born natural historian Wladyslaw Starewicz left a mark on animation as strong as Walt Disney or the Fleischer Brothers, influencing everyone from Jan Svankmajer to Terry Gilliam, but where other animators seemed to cull their material from the land of the living, Starewicz’s feel like they’ve been dug out of the ground (and they are, basically). The result is an extremely unsettling palette of dead bugs, taxidermied animals, skeletons, and rear projected real world backgrounds blended into something that predicts the work of Salvador Dali, George A. Romero, and Mister Ed the talking horse. Several prints in this program have been provided by animation historian and archivist Tom Stathes. Visit him at Cartoons on Film and the Bray Animation Project. (JA)

The Program
The Revenge of a Kinematograph Cameraman (1912, 12 min, 16mm)
The Frogs Who Wanted A King (1922, 9 min, 16mm)
The Voice of the Nightingale (1925, 13 min, 16mm)
The Town Rat and the Country Rat (1927, 10 min, 16mm)
The Mascot (1934, 26 min, 16mm)

NOTE CHANGE: One show only.

Cinema Borealis • 1550 N. Milwaukee Ave, 4th Floor
Suggested Donation: $10

This entry was posted in News. Bookmark the permalink.