Incredible! Invisible! Insatiable! A Thursday Screening?
Don Siegel’s Body Snatchers Invades the Portage in 35mm

The Portage Theater – 4050 N. Milwaukee Ave – 7:30 – $5.00 per ticket
For the full schedule of classic film screenings at the Portage, please click here.

July 5
INVASION OF THE BODY SNATCHERS
Directed by Don Siegel • 1956
The residents of fictional Santa Mira, California (also home to Halloween III, for whatever it’s worth) are one by one imperceptibly taken over by pod people, eventually leaving only Kevin McCarthy and his psychiatrist. Originally titled Sleep No More, this was the first of the several adaptations of Jack Finney’s 1954 novel The Body Snatchers, and Don Siegel’s allegory of cultural totalitarianism still remains the most frightening and relevant. Employing virtually no special effects, Siegel’s no-nonsense, low-budget masterpiece seems miles ahead of everything else going on in ’50s sci-fi, and features one of the most claustrophobic uses of widescreen to date (it helps that the SuperScope aspect ratio was forced on it after much of the film was shot for a slightly less wide composition). Look for Sam Peckinpah in a small, small role as a meter reader (he also worked as a dialog coach on this and several other Siegel productions in the 50s), and watch out! You could be next, and you probably are… (JA)
80 min • Allied Artists Pictures • 35mm from Paramount Pictures
Plus: Trailers from 1950s Sci-Fi Thrillers – 35mm – ~ 15 min

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One Response to Incredible! Invisible! Insatiable! A Thursday Screening?
Don Siegel’s Body Snatchers Invades the Portage in 35mm

  1. Mark Vanselow says:

    “Invasion of the Body Snatchers” is one of my favourite movies. I was extremely fortunate to experience a print of this film several years ago at the Australian Centre for the Moving Image (Melbourne, Australia). It was preceded by “Red Nightmare”, a short film featuring Jack Webb.

    “Invasion of the Body Snatchers” still holds up as a classic after more than one-half century. To witness this film inside a theatre is indeed a rare treat. I love the themes about conformity and dehumanisation, and the struggle to remain free and human. Kevin McCarthy is absolutely magnificent in this film. Believe me, if I were in Chicago, I’d definitely get along to this screening!

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